Cool Days, Warm Hands

mitten

Kindergarten has been working on using pattern in an artwork and learning warm and cool colors.  The result?  Warm colored mittens covered in a zentangle-ish pattern and backgrounds painted in cool colors, using plastic wrap to create an icy texture.

Enjoy these paintings by Hallie and Zach.

mitten1

mitten2

“Bookish” Owls

Third graders designed these pattern owls and drew them on recycled paper from books slated for the big dumpster outside of school.  When the Librarian told me that she was throwing away books, I literally grabbed them.  I think the pages make our owls look like pretty smart fowl.

Students had a wide range of owl resources to look at while drawing and then brainstormed the patterns.  After going over the pencil lines with sharpie, the owls were either painted with liquid watercolor or colored with markers.

These owls brought to you by Reagan, Annaliese, and Henry.

 

Russian Basilicas

This is a great line and pattern lesson for second grade students.  They love to look at architecture, especially from other cultures.

Materials:  Watercolor paper, hand outs with architectural elements, pencils, sharpies, liquid watercolor or (semi moist in pans), brushes, salt, saran wrap, sequins, glitter glue flat backed rhinestones, etc. Resource pictures of Russian onion domed buildings.

Vocabulary: Russian Architecture, Onion Dome, Basilica, Pattern, Embellishment, Flat Wash

Process:

  1.  View pictures of Russian architecture, particularly onion-domed buildings.    Students practice drawing these buildings on white scrap paper.  I demonstrate drawing some of the elements.
  2. 2. Students now choose a piece of watercolor paper and use a pencil to draw their Russian buildings, filling the paper and incorporating line and pattern into the overall design.
  3. Students paint the background first, using a wet on wet watercolor wash in cool colors and adding texture by laying crumpled saran wrap on top until dry or adding salt to wet areas.
  4. Next, students paint the buildings, making sure to use a fairly dry brush (for better control of color placement) to add color to the buildings.  I demonstrate jumping around in areas of my paper, not painting next to a wet area.
  5. When the paint is finished drying, students can add embellishments such as glitter glue to highlight patterns and gluing rhinestones and sequins to buildings.

Student Examples: